I’m back to reviewing Clean Code this week after last week’s blog on Refactoring. And while the chapter I’m reviewing this week is short, the concept is incredibly important. This week I’m talking about boundaries, the way we incorporate code that we did not actually write into our systems.

At a mere eight pages, Clean Code’s chapter on boundaries is one of the shortest in the book. But while the advice is relatively concise, in my opinion your ability to cleanly integrate third-party code into your applications will make or break your success as a developer.

Every software engineer, almost…


I’ve been loving reading through Clean Code, but am taking a bit of a break this week to discuss the first chapter of Martin Fowler’s Refactoring. Like Clean Code, Refactoring is fairly famous amongst professional programmers for its clear and concise advice on how to write clean, readable, and highly effective code. Now in its second edition and containing incredible insights from Fowler, Refactoring is frequently included in lists of the best programming books available (Seriously, I just googled “Best Programming Books” and it is listed in each of the top four results). …


I’m continuing my series on Clean Code this week, but I wanted to do something different with this blog post. When I first started reading Bob Martin’s classic handbook for writing better code, the advice given to me was to read it very, very slowly. If you have a physical copy, someone told me, it should look like a cherished family heirloom: dog-eared, flipped through back and forth, and clearly used. In fact, Clean Code offers the same advice. As Uncle Bob writes in the introduction, this is not a “feel good book that you can read on an airplane…


As followers of this blog know, I’m currently reading through Clean Code, a classic in how to write readable, professional code. Written primarily by “Uncle Bob” Martin, with appearances from a number of leading thinkers in the field of AGILE software development, Clean Code isn’t exactly a step-by-step coding manual. While I covet another animal-adorned O’Reilly book as much as the next code junkie, Clean Code won’t teach you a particular language or framework. Rather, Clean Code’s subtitle — “A Handbook of Software Craftsmanship” — explains the broader purpose of this book.

Uncle Bob wants you to write clean code

For Bob Martin and his co-authors, Clean Code…


As followers of this blog may have noticed, I’ve been referencing Clean Code quite a bit the last several weeks. I started reading the book on the advice of a friend and fellow software engineer, who extolled the values of this classic programming text. I’ve been going through it very slowly, reading just one chapter a week to make sure I plant these lessons deep in my head. Still, I can see how Clean Code is having a significant effect on how I think about the code I write as well as the code I’ll write in the future.

The classic

Written…


As web developers, we’re required to use innumerable tools throughout the day, picking up this hammer or that chisel to write better code everyday. But luckily for us, our tools are a lot more sophisticated than the run of the mill hand tools.

One of the things I love most about building software is the ability to work on technology as advanced as integrated development environments (IDEs, for short). To be sure, Microsoft’s VS Code is one of the best tools in the space.

VS Code logo

If this sounds like it’s going to be a free ad for Microsoft’s Visual Studio Code…


As almost anyone who works with the language knows, JavaScript is an immensely powerful language, and is used by developers across the stack. When it first burst onto the programming scene, it changed the way software engineers work, and is far and away the most widely used language by professionals today.

JS’s rank among professional developers

But as powerful (and fun) as JavaScript can be, it is just one language, and it has certain limitations. You can’t expect it to do everything. Coders coming from other languages may find themselves thinking, “There’s no sleep() function in JavaScript? …


I’m taking a small break from my regular blog series on creative code because I think this topic is so important. While I’m advancing my design skills with p5.js week by week (and enhancing my JavaScript skills in the process), I’m still a professional full-stack software engineer, eager to build applications and websites that will leave the world better than I found it. Therefore, I need to keep my skills up to date.

In my professional work building hearth.io, I’m exposing myself to the latest technologies used to build the web. One of the pieces of tech I’ve been immersing…


As followers of this blog know well by now, I’m trying something a little different with this series. While I’m continuing to work on my full-stack web applications (and improving my GraphQL, Git, TypeScript, and countless other skills), I’m also blogging through Code as Creative Medium (CaCM), a workbook and collection of exercises designed to teach both coders about art and artists about code. By working in p5.js to create a unique piece of art every week, I’m giving myself an opportunity to enhance my JavaScript skills while making interesting pieces of design. …


There are countless ways to get involved with creative code. While it’s true there are several languages that creative-type developers use to write code, there are also dozens of libraries that facilitate the process, and coders could go down rabbit holes for years delving more deeply into the various tools at one’s disposal.

As I explained last time on this blog, each week I will be chronicling my creative coding journey on Medium. For my next entry in this series, I will get up and running with actually writing code, beginning my creative coding journey by in p5.js. …

Jacob on Software

My name is Jacob. I build software.

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